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Helen Hayes, Raymond Loewy and Mark Twain Honored on 2011 U.S. Stamps
12/30/10

Three CMG clients will be part of the U.S. Postal Service's 2011 Commemorative Stamp Program. This year's CMG honorees are actress Helen Hayes, industrial designer Raymond Loewy and author Mark Twain.

These legends are three of 25 subjects highlighted in the stamp program, which was unveiled on Dec. 28.

To view the entire stamp program, click here.

Helen Hayes

Actress Helen Hayes, who justly deserved the title "First Lady of the American Theater" for her radiant presence on Broadway for much of the twentieth century will be honored on a stamp in April. She also gave memorable and award-winning performances on radio, film, and television.

The stamp features original art by Drew Struzan, whose movie posters for the Indiana Jones and Star Wars series have been seen by millions. Struzan based his design for the stamp on a photograph taken of Hayes circa 1958.


Raymond Loewy


The Pioneers of American Industrial Design stamp pane honors 12 of the nation's most important and influential industrial designers. These stamps, which go on sale in July, include the pencil sharpener designed by Raymond Loewy.

Raymond Loewy arguably did more to define the look of modern America than perhaps any other industrial designer. Loewy created the distinctive look of Air Force One and worked with NASA on the interiors of America's first space station, Skylab. In 1971, he created the logo for the newly formed U.S. Postal Service, and his designs have appeared on several postage stamps.


Mark Twain


With the 27th stamp in the Literary Arts series, the Postal Service honors Mark Twain, author of beloved works such as Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, widely considered one of the greatest novels in American literature. The stamp goes on sale in June.

In this tale of an abused boy and a runaway slave who become friends while riding a raft down the Mississippi River, Twain addressed issues of race and racism in America with a frankness that is still startling more than a hundred years later.


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